What OS are you using to self host?

What OS are you using? is it a mixture or a specific one?

I currently been using different flavors of Linux. Been using Archlinux as a Desktop, Fedora for some gaming servers and raspberry for those smaller devices.

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I’m still trying to get the hang with selfhosting, so i’m sticking with Ubuntu-Server 22.04.2 LTS.
My Raspberry is only running Octoprint.
And for my desktop i’m running Windows 10 for now.

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I tried various options and used Arch for a while, but for simplicity reasons, I now stick with Debian and have had no major issues.

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Proxmox on my hosts, then Debian 11 (soon to be 12) for my vm’s and lxc’s

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I’m using ESXi on my main host, with a mix of Ubuntu Server and RHEL for the guest VMs, along with one Windows 2019 for AD. The Ubuntu VMs are used for Docker containers. I use ESXi and RHEL at work so I get to play around and try different things at home, and I’m currently building a new environment for work using Active Directory for AAA.

I also have a bunch of Raspberry Pi’s (pies?) that I used before setting up the ESXi server that ran Raspbian OS.

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So I’ve found that the latetst flavor of Ubuntu Server has been the most compatible OS for an out of the box experience. However, it can be quite bloated and confusing with Snap Packages and flatpaks. I have three servers running Ubuntu Server 22.04 LTS, another running Arch Linux and one running fedora server 38. I also have some PI’s running the latest Rasbian. I’ve had to touch or run Maintenace the least on the Ubuntu machines.

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cool I installed Octoprint as well but, need to fix my Supra printer before I start using it.

you using any automation tool for maintenance and updates?

Proxmox and Ubuntu primarily. I use TacticalRMM for monitoring and then ansible to update the VM’s.

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I’ve settled on using Ubuntu LTS for my stuff. Used to use ESXi with various Debian VMs but over time as I got used to docker Ubuntu has worked well enough on bare metal. And then a small script to zip/copy all the data folders to my NAS takes care of backups so I was able to take Veeam out of the picture

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I use openSUSE Leap on servers for the stability as they have the best kernel maintainers.

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cool. I barely used opensuse and run into more RHEL. Even before the position I currently do.

I’ve been a long time Debian user on my server. The current server went from Buster to Bullseye to Bookworm.

The upgrades have been very stable and robust. My applications run inside Docker and are relatively independent from the host system.

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I run Debian on my Raspberry and Ubuntu on my VPS.

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I currently update via a cron job but I learned already that for Ubuntu the package unattended-upgrades is the real way to do this. So I want to change this soon.

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Debian Linux for more than 10 years on a server, rarely upgrade it. Restarts once every 1 year, mainly due to cloud provider’s upgrades.

Raspbian on the raspberry pi.

Desktop → Linux Mint

Played with mandrake, fedora, centos, ubuntu but debian’s the most stable of them all. Sure, it has “older” software on it. But in the end you can use containers for more recent builds.

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I’m just using Synology’s DSM on my NAS. It’s not the most interesting answer, but it works well enough for my purposes. I’m a little surprised I’m the only one so far. I deal with enough server crap at work, so I prefer to keep things relatively simple at home.

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have you used ansible?

I still haven‘t wrapped my head around ansible to the point to fully build a system from scratch.
I would like to though.
I build lemmy with this recently and it worked great. Now I want to find more guides around this topic.

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no problem. If you need some information let me know.